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Interactions

Alpha-ketoglutarate/Drug Interactions:
  • Cardiovascular agentsCardiovascular agents: In human research, alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) has been shown to reduce plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme concentrations (28; 29).
  • Dermatologic agentsDermatologic agents: An in vitro study conducted on cultured human dermal fibroblasts showed that AKG (10mcM) stimulated procollagen production and increased the activity of prolidase, an enzyme that plays an important role in collagen metabolism (2). The same study also showed that long-term topical application of AKG (1%) on ultraviolet UVB-induced hairless mice decreased wrinkle formation.
  • HepatotoxinsHepatotoxins: In human research, pyridoxine AKG reduced hyperammonemia and plasma levels of pyruvic acid, lactic acid, and glutamine, and increased plasma levels of glutamic acid (34).
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Alpha-ketoglutarate/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Amino acidsAmino acids: Using amino acid supplements with AKG-supplemented parenteral or enteral nutrition may increase arginine, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine (1); proline (1; 27); glutamine (34); and histidine (1; 27).
  • Cardiovascular agentsCardiovascular agents: In human research, AKG has been shown to reduce plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme concentrations (28; 29).
  • Dermatologic agentsDermatologic agents: An in vitro study conducted on cultured human dermal fibroblasts showed that AKG (10mcM) stimulated procollagen production and increased the activity of prolidase, an enzyme that plays an important role in collagen metabolism (2). The same study also showed that long-term topical application of AKG (1%) on ultraviolet UVB-induced hairless mice decreased wrinkle formation.
  • HepatotoxinsHepatotoxins: In human research, pyridoxine AKG reduced hyperammonemia and plasma levels of pyruvic acid, lactic acid, and glutamine, and increased plasma levels of glutamic acid (34).
  • Phosphates, phosphorusPhosphates, phosphorus: Calcium alpha-ketoglutarate has been shown to reduce hyperphosphatemia by reducing plasma phosphate levels and normalizing Ca-P levels (1; 27; 31) in hemodialysis patients; pyridoxine AKG (PAK) may reduce plasma phosphate levels (34).
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Alpha-ketoglutarate/Food Interactions:
  • Lipofundin® (fat emulsion)Lipofundin® (fat emulsion): Lipofundin®, within 24 hours of infusion, significantly altered the concentration of AKG and other metabolites, such as pyruvate and lactate (33).
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Alpha-ketoglutarate/Lab Interactions:
  • AlbuminAlbumin: Prealbumin levels were increased following AKG administration in trauma patients (35), which is an indicator of improved protein metabolism.
  • Alpha-ketoacidsAlpha-ketoacids: Calcium alpha-ketoglutarate has been shown to increase concentrations of alpha-ketoanalogs, alpha-ketoisocaproate, alpha-ketoisovalerate, and alpha-ketomethylvalarate (analogs of branched-chain amino acids involved in the regulation of proteolysis or protein biosynthesis in the cells) (1).
  • Amino acidsAmino acids: Using amino acid supplements with AKG-supplemented parenteral or enteral nutrition may increase arginine, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine (1); proline (1; 27); glutamine (34); and histidine (1; 27).
  • Creatine kinaseCreatine kinase: AKG has been shown to reduce plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme concentrations (28; 29).
  • PhosphatePhosphate: In hemodialysis patients, calcium alpha-ketoglutarate reduced hyperphosphatemia by reducing plasma phosphate levels and normalizing Ca-P levels (1; 27; 31); pyridoxine AKG (PAK) may reduce plasma phosphate levels (34).
  • Tumor markersTumor markers: In human and animal research, alpha-ketoglutarate was suggested to serve as a marker for differentially diagnosing malignant breast and gastrointestinal tract neoplasms at advanced stages (36).
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Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.